The Gowanus Canal • September 6, 2021

Special thanks to Gary @standupvirgin who invited me to see first-hand our mistreated water but also appreciate its value and the life that found ways to exist despite of the pollution @gowanusdredgers

From watching it by in a subway car to taking it slow and riding it on canoe: The Gowanus Canal.

Recent Media Consumption:

The Guerrilla Girls’ Bedside Companion to the History of Western Art

Photographers on Photography : How the Masters See, Think & Shoot by Henry Carroll

Disney’s Cruella

Kahlo by Eckhard Hollman

For the Love of Music: A Conductor’s Guide to the Art of Listening by John Mauceri

Blame! by Tsutomu Nihei

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gowanus_Canal

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/sep/02/gowanus-canal-brooklyn-new-york-toxic-cleanup-epa

http://www.gowanuscanal.org

Perceiving a summer memory

A dream: An invisible man in a non-hostile world

“And then the dust falls”

Long ago, summer meant time away from school.
Idyllic and comforting
There was time for everything
The time to truly play

To all the invisible people: I hope we find each other after the dust falls.

Recent Influences:

YouTube: Photographer Andre D. Wagner’s essay “On Being a Black Photographer” by CBS This Morning

YouTube: Making a Photobook with Wesley Verhoeve by Framelines

YouTube: Conversations | Photography Talk | The Future(s) of Photography by Art Basel

Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

The Ralph Ellison Memorial on 150th Street and Riverside Drive

Raymond Moore Photographer, uploaded by David Moore

Recurring Thoughts:

Nihilism (Epistemological & Existential)

Maroon (My internal Maroon Space)

Running away & escaping

Artist Talk: Documenting Urban Change

About this Event

Land dispossession both historically and in modern times has affected the experiences of people of color all over the world. Whether through colonialism or gentrification Black and Brown people have had to grapple with the real challenges brought on by population growth, capitalism and greed.

In the third artist talk from our virtual exhibition series “West Harlem Arts: Resilience 2021,” we bring together four intergenerational artists that are all documenting the urban environment and using their voice to record and bring attention to this ongoing dilemma. Join Cathleen Campbell, Daisy Ruiz, Jonas St. Juste and Nicole Goodwin as they share their experience documenting the land, people and places that they call home.

Saturday May 22, 2021 at 4:00pm

RSVP: Click here

This event is presented in conjunction with “West Harlem Arts: Resilience 2021,” a virtual exhibition series from The Children’s Art Carnival and Centro Civico Cultural Dominicano on view until May 22, 2021 at WestHarlemArts.org.

West Harlem Arts: Resilience 2021 is part of The Children’s Art Carnival ‘s New Normal Skills Development Series, presented in partnership with Centro Civico Cultural Dominicano.

Virtual Community Workshops, Establishing Your Community Practice Workshops, New Normal Skills Development Series, and Sunday Salon @ The Children’s Art Carnival are made possible with funding from West Harlem Development Corporation.

To learn more about The Children’s Art Carnival: Click here

To learn more about Centro Civico Cultural Dominicano: Click here

To view the West Harlem Arts: Resilience 2021 Exhibition: Click here